Epic Poetry Reading in Chidlaw Gallery

Last night was the culmination of Senior, Samantha McCormick’s 30-day performance in the Art Academy’s Chidlaw Gallery.  This pinnacle of performance and poetry wonder featured introductory readings by students – Kyle Cottier, Chloë Bell, Billy Golden, and professor & Poet in Residence – Matt Hart, followed by several readings from Samantha’s new book of poetry and writing: Fatal Character.  For your reading pleasure below is one of the poems Samantha read for a crowd of 35 last night, titled “Today I’ve Decided.”

Today I’ve Decided

 

Instead of poems and pieces of exploding,

I will make paper balls. It’s what the people want,

the people want paper balls. They want them

flooding the streets and burying their cars. They want

paper balls, all crinkled up in frustration, to interrupt

wedding ceremonies and Christmas mornings.

They want them in beds, right under the sheets

against their bodies. The people have spoken.

They demand that no more time be wasted in typing,

in thinking, in words – they just want paper balls.

They want them in trash bins, they like the idea of them

as classic imagery, but they want them to also move

from trash bins into landfills. They want paper balls

for pocket change they want paper balls for lottery tickets.

Paper balls should be the new currency they said,

and I am here to serve the people. The paper ball people.

They want different colored paper balls in air balloons,

paper balls in locker rooms, paper balls to keep

an eye on their daughter as she goes on her first date.

Paper balls should be the main course at fancy restaurants

and also not so fancy restaurants. We should eat paper balls.

The people want to swallow them whole or cut them up

into tiny bite size pieces for easy consumption.

Paper balls will sing the national anthem at all sporting events.

Paper balls will be granted the right to sing. The people will collect

greatest hits albums: Paper Balls of the 80’s, Paper Balls

of the 90’s, Smooth Jazz Paper Balls, and Death Metal Paper Balls.

The people will make babies to the sound of paper balls

for generations to come. You will be able to buy

diamond paper balls and paper balls made of engine parts.

Paper balls will guide people home from holiday breaks

where family relationships will feel less awkward shoved together

around dinner tables because the tables will be overflowing

with paper ball dishes. We will make dinosaur fossils into paper balls

so that we can enjoy visits to museums, they will be framed and sold

as expensive works of art – we will make the art into paper balls.

Paper ball stars will adorn the tops of Christmas trees.

The street signs will be made of paper balls, the paper ball cars

will come with new and exciting safety features –

along with seat warmers and extra large paper ball cup holders.

The children will play in ball pits filled with paper balls

while the parents discuss the educational value

of paper balls. They want the best for their children,

they demand paper ball learning plans.

The demand for paper balls will crush our culture

and the people will start to go mad. We will attend

paper ball therapy sessions in droves, like paper ball zombies,

and take prescription paper ball pills (responsibly at first

and then we will become paper ball addicts). The paper balls

will be melted down and shot up into our veins

and we will drift off into the ether with paper ball sugar plum fairies

in our heads. We will place paper balls on gravestones

and find God in paper balls. I am making paper balls for the people,

for the paper ball future. It is here my friends. We will make paper

ball weapons and continue to kill each other

even though we will all have our fill of the things we need.

Paper balls will consume our lives. We will fuck ourselves,

lonely, with paper balls and wish for something – anything-

other than paper balls. The people will curse paper balls

and fall prey to paper ball wants and dreams and I will cry

endlessly while I toil away making paper balls,

wishing that I could make poems instead.